Category Archives: Family History Courses

WDYTYA? Live 2016 : So much to do, So little time

The evening after the day before. I’m still recovering after a 220 mile round trip and a jam-packed day at “WDYTYA? Live”.

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The “Ask the Experts” area, busy right from the off

This year I focused on talks as trailed here. I did a mixture of ticketed and free talks. Pre-booking the Society of Genealogists (SoG) Workshops proved a wise choice for me – I think all my chosen ones had sold out before the event. So it meant this year I got a seat instead of loitering on the periphery.

I picked up lots of useful tips from all three SoG talks I attended, including search tips and suggested books. I now have a couple of new research strategies and record sets to check out for my Irish research from “Luck of the Irish”. It was fascinating to follow step by step the methods used in conducting research from one name in Meath, tracing the family back to way beyond pre Civil Registration.

And, following on from “Tracing a 16th and 17th Century Family Tree”, the moment I got home I ordered a copy of “Courts of the Manors of Bandon and Beddington 1489-1552” to help with my Latin to English translation of Manorial records.  Going to a Catholic school and studying Latin for two years is of limited help – and then only for basic words. My “Ecce Romani” Latin is useless for Manorial rolls!

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A Packed “Tracing a 16th and 17th Century Family” Tree Workshop

My husband also attended three workshops. He’s only into Family History at a basic level, but learned lots from the “What they Don’t Tell you about Visiting Archives” and WW1 research talk “Overcoming Trench Walls”. He came away fired with enthusiasm, and insisted there and then on sharing his new-found knowledge!

As a journalist he also attended the “Copyright and Family History” talk. It was interesting to compare his perspective of what is done in reality (and ways round things), to what should be done.  He said this talk would put the fear of God into anyone about doing anything!

As an old-school journalist he was trained in shorthand, so made copious notes. I will be keeping an eye on the SoG website  http://www.sog.org.uk/ because, as in previous years, many (but not all) of the speakers’ handouts or slides presented at the show will be uploaded in due course.

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Final Packed Workshop of the Day – Research Before 1837

I also attended Debbie Kennett’s “Autosomal DNA Pleasures and Pitfalls” talk. A clear explanation of a complex subject, and I now feel better prepared to re-visit my DNA tests. Immediately on my return home I downloaded her talk slides and joined the “DNA help for Genealogy (UK)” Facebook page. So these should help with what is a daunting subject for my scientifically-challenged mind.

One nugget I did take away with me, which hadn’t previously crossed my mind with the Ancestry DNA kit, was the need to factor in my annual Ancestry subscription cost. This is required in order to be able to continue to access the full range of their DNA online result features.

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Debbie Kennett Points out the Pleasures and Pitfalls of Autosomal DNA

One talk which me and my husband attended together was Andrew Robertshaw’s “The Story of the Somme”. As my husband put it, the clearest most concise 20 minute explanation he has ever heard.

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“The Story of the Somme” – one of the highlights of the show for me

As a result of the number of talks I attended, regretfully I didn’t have as much time as I needed to explore the rest of the cornucopia of exhibitors. I did plan out in advance those I wanted to visit but didn’t get round them all. Part of the problem was navigating the stand numbering system – I kept getting hopelessly lost and distracted.

I was particularly disappointed I didn’t make it to the Forces War Records stand to see what the discount was, as I am considering subscribing.

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WW2 Spitfire in the Forces War Records Area

I did manage to get my 25% Ancestry renewal discount. Definitely one bargain not to be missed out on.

I was torn about purchasing some more DNA kits for the family. Ancestry had a great deal, with kits retailing at a massively discounted £59 and Family Tree DNA’s autosomal Family Finder kit at £65. I decided against it. But with luck, judging by the rate they were flying off the shelves, I may get some more matches (hopefully with attached trees).

As ever I spent a small fortune on books, my big weakness. The Pen & Sword stand got the largest chunk of my book cash. Their offer of three books for £30 proved far too tempting and I ended up buying 5 for £40! Only the fact I’ve got the indispensable “Phillimore Atlas of Parish Registers” stopped me from grabbing a £20 bargain at The History Press stand.

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Pen & Sword Haul

I also managed to sign up for a Pharos course (with 20% discount). So I’ll be doing their “Introduction to One-Name Studies” course in May. For good measure I ended up registering a one-name study name with the Guild – heaven knows how much extra work I’ve landed myself there!

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More Goodies – including One-Name Studies Guidance

On the subject of courses, I managed to speak to a number of providers. I’m now pondering about doing the Pharos Advanced course, the Institute of Heraldic & Genealogical Studies (IHGS) correspondence course or a Centre for Archive and Information Studies (CAIS) one. As ever for me the sticking point is fitting genealogy learning around work commitments. I need the flexibility. I also want a course which will potentially lead to formal accreditation with the Association of Genealogists and Researchers in Archives (AGRA).

And talking, listening and learning is another fantastic thing about “WDYTYA? Live”. It was great to meet so many people who share this passion for family history, including so many #AncestryHour Twitter folk! So faces to Twitter names at last.

Given my interest in WW1 history, I visit Flanders and the Somme annually. So the show provided me opportunity to do some planning for my two visits scheduled for this year.

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Holiday Planning

On a WW1 theme finally, as the show was winding up, Chris and I paid for joint membership of the Western Front Association, something we’ve meant to do for quite some time.

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Plenty for Military Researchers

Yet again I thoroughly enjoyed my day at “WDYTYA? Live”. The talks I attended were excellent. However, given that I felt I missed so much this year in terms of exhibitors, next year I won’t try to cram everything into one day. I will stay for two, possibly the full three, days. That in itself sums up how useful the event is.end of show

A Bit of Good News

In my post Education, Education, Education I said I would be embarking on an online course, “Searching for Wills and Administrations in England and Wales”. This was my final module in the Pharos Tutors and the Society of Genealogists Family History Skills & Strategies (FHSS) (Intermediate) with Certificate programme.

I completed the module at the end of February and I’ve now received the result. I’m pleased, and relieved, to say it was a distinction. Relieved because, having achieved that level in all the other modules, I didn’t want to slip up at the final hurdle. And it means that overall I’ve passed the FHSS Certificate with distinction.  

 I can definitely recommend the Certificate. I’d been researching my family tree for about seven years prior to undertaking the courses, but I discovered there was so much I hadn’t considered.  

Apart from having a lot of fun in a wonderfully supportive environment, I’ve learned so much about a broad range of records across many aspects of family history research. But beyond these sources, the certificate courses helped me focus on the importance of research planning as well as critically analysing and interpreting the records, putting them into their historical context.  

As a direct result of implementing the knowledge and skills I’ve gained through the Certificate, I’ve made many breakthroughs in my own family history research. The “Wills” module was no exception. I hope to write about this latest brick wall demolition in the coming weeks.  

So now I’ve completed the FHSS Certificate I’ve to decide on my next steps. Do I want to push on with my genealogy education? Do I want to take on more research for others than I do currently? If so what are the options? The Pharos Tutors/Society of Genealogists Advanced Certificate? IHGS? Or a University of Strathclyde or Dundee course? Can I even commit the time to further structured learning, given I have a “day job, albeit part-time? Or do I take a step back and concentrate on my own research? I’ll decide in the coming weeks. Possibly after “Who Do You Think You Are? Live

Education, Education, Education: My Family History Learning 

My blogging output may decrease over the next few weeks as I’ve scheduled some time for learning.

On 23 January I started my latest Pharos Tutors online genealogy course, “Searching for Wills and Administrations in England and Wales”.  I’ve completed several Pharos courses and find this online learning method works well for me, fitting around work and family commitments. This will be my final module in their Family History Skills & Strategies (Intermediate) with Certificate programme. The explanation about how these certificate courses work is here.    
I’ve also booked three (free) National Archives webinars scheduled for March. These are:

I participated in their 1939 Register webinar at the end of 2015. It was really informative and the technology was easy to grasp worked well, prompting me to book more. So I’m converted to this form of learning. This, and previous webinars, can be found online. Their programme of events is here.

And to complete my latest foray into the world of family history education I’ve enrolled on a  FutureLearn course, “Genealogy: Researching your Family Tree”. This again is an online course, running for six weeks with a time commitment of around four hours per week. The course is a University of Strathclyde one, so I have high hopes.

The course description is to:

……. help you develop an understanding of the basic genealogy techniques and how to communicate your family history. We will consider how to effectively find and analyse sources and explore the potential of DNA testing as applied to genealogy. We’ll help you add historical context to your family history and discuss how to record and communicate research findings in a clear fashion”.

I’m particularly interested in the DNA angle. Hopefully it will stimulate me to return to my stalled genetic genealogy journey, referred to in three blog posts from last year:

This will be my first FutureLearn course, so I’m quite interested to find out how it works and if the learning style suits me as they have a number of other courses I’d be very interested in.

So the “keeping informed” element of my genealogy New Year’s Resolutions  is progressing nicely.